ecology

Beever, Erik

Research Ecologist
Dept. of Ecology
U.S. Geological Survey, Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center

After completing my B.S. in Biological Sciences at U.C. Davis and my Ph.D. in Ecology, Evolution, and Conservation Biology at Univ. of NV, Reno under Drs. Joel Berger and Peter Brussard, I performed postdoctoral research under Dr. Dennis Murphy (in montane biodiversity) and Dr. David Pyke (in aridlands and rangeland ecologies).

Belote, Travis

Senior Research Ecologist
Research Department, Northern Rockies Office
The Wilderness Society

Dr. Travis Belote earned his PhD in Biological Sciences from Virginia Tech in 2008 and serves as a forest ecologist in the Research Department of The Wilderness Society in its Northern Rockies Regional Office in Bozeman, Montana. His research focuses on questions related to how ecological communities are structured and their response to disturbance, land use change, natural resource management, and aspects of global change (including biological invasions).

Berger, Joel

Professor
Organismal Biology and Ecology
The University of Montana - Missoula

To be completed by applicant.

Bischke, Scott

MS Chemical Engineer, writer, facilitator
science and engineering
MountainWorks Incorporated

MountainWorks specializes in custom solutions in several fields, leveraging the talents of its two principals, Scott Bischke and Katie Gibson. Fields of specialty include software design, web application development, environmental and electrical engineering services, technical meeting facilitation, and technical writing/editing. Much of our work is in the environmental or natural resource realm, and with start up or early phase companies, though not exclusively.

Blank, Carrine

Research Assistant Professor
Geosciences
The University of Montana - Missoula

To be completed by applicant.

Boyd, Eric

Assistant Research Professor
Chemistry and Biochemistry
Montana State University - Bozeman

The distribution of microorganisms and the functions that they catalyze on Earth today is rooted, at least in part, to the numerous adaptations to occupy discrete ecological niches (e.g., multiplicity of environmental factors characterizing a microenvironment) that have played out over evolutionary time. Such responses are recorded in the extant distributional pattern of organisms, as well as the genetic record of those organisms.

Brett Addis

AY2012-13
Department: 
Division of Biological Sciences
College/University: 
University of Montana

Breuner, Creagh

Associate Professor
Organismal Biology and Ecology
The University of Montana - Missoula

There is intrinsic conflict between survival and reproduction. This conflict can be viewed from the pace of life framework (an ultimate view), trading off many offspring per year over a short life vs. few per year over a longer life; it can also be viewed from a resource utilization perspective (a proximate view), increasing current reproductive effort vs. self maintenance. In general, outside of individual quality arguments, there is an inverse relationship between reproduction and survival. How is this conflict mediated within individuals?

Brody, Michael

Associate Professor
Education
Montana State University - Bozeman

My research and education activities include interdisciplinary projects that have an educational research component. This includes research and education activities related to teaching, learning, curriculum and assessment. I am also engaged in a number of projects which have an international focus. Several projects involve native people and indigenous knowledge.

Brookshire, Jack

Assistant Professor
Land Resources and Environmental Sciences
Montana State University - Bozeman

My area of expertise is in biogeochemistry and ecosystem ecology. My research emphasizes nutrient
dynamics in forests, atmospheric chemistry, global change, watershed analysis, stable isotope analysis,
field experimentation, and modeling.

Burkle, Laura

Assistant Professor
Ecology
Montana State University - Bozeman

My research interests include understanding the consequences of environmental factors, such as climate change, invasive species, land-use change, and nutrient availability on the biodiversity of native plants and their interactions with animal mutualists and antagonists. In particular, I use a combination of observational, experimental, and theoretical approaches to examine the structure and function of plant-pollinator interactions at the community level.

Callaway, Ragan

Professor
Division of Biologial Sciences
The University of Montana - Missoula

The primary focus of the research in my lab is on how organisms interact with each other, but we are interested in all aspects of ecology. These interactions include direct interactions, such as competition for resources, allelopathy, and facilitation; and indirect interactions mediated by herbivores, soil microbes, and other competitors. I continue to study facilitative interactions among plants, mostly alpine habitats and in collaboration with the international Alpine Pals research group.

Cleveland, Cory

Assistant Professor
Ecosystem and Conservation Sciences
The University of Montana - Missoula

To be completed by applicant

Crabtree, Bob

Chief Scientist
Ecosystems and Conservation Sciences
Yellowstone Ecological Research Center

Dr. Crabtree is the Founder and Chief Scientist of the Yellowstone Ecological Research Center (YERC) and has been conducting ecological research in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem for nearly 20 years. With a strong belief in collaborative research and education, he has crafted 47 MOUs, MOAs, and CRADAs with universities and federal agencies; served as PI on over 50 grant awards; and advised, co-advised, and supervised 41 graduate students and 3 post-docs working in the YERC lab in Bozeman.

Cripps, Cathy

Associate Professor
Plant Sciences and Plant Pathology
Montana State University - Bozeman

Our lab examines basic and applied aspects of higher fungi, particularly in extreme environments such as the alpine life zone and high-elevation forests. Currently we are focused on the ectomycorrhizal fungi associated with whitebark pine and the biodiversity/biogeography of true alpine fungi in the Rocky Mountains. Whitebark pine forests are in serious decline in the West due to blister rust, mountain pine beetles, fire suppression and climate change. This landscape scale changes from forest decline will affect hydologic dynamics at the top of watersheds.

Cross, Molly

Climate Change Adaptation Scientist
North America Program
Wildlife Conservation Society

Molly Cross is the Climate Change Adaptation Coordinator for the North America Program of the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS). Her work focuses on bringing together experts in the fields of climate change, ecology, conservation-planning and land management to translate broad-brush climate change adaptation strategies into on-the-ground conservation actions. Molly is leading scenario-based climate change planning efforts involving government agencies and diverse stakeholders at several landscapes across North America--including the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, northern U.S.

Cross, Paul

Disease Ecologist
Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center
U.S. Geological Survey

My research integrates field ecology, animal behavior, statistics, mathematical modeling, remote sensing, microbiology, virology and genetics to address wildlife disease, conservation and management issues. No single person can develop the necessary expertise in all of these fields, so I collaborate with a team of academics and managers. There are two central themes in my research: (1) the integration of empirical data and mathematical modeling, and (2) the effects of host behavior and social structure on disease dynamics.

Cross, Wyatt

Assistant Professor
Ecology
Montana State University - Bozeman

Research in my laboratory is devoted to understanding patterns and processes in freshwater ecosystems. In particular, we're interested in the linkages between food web dynamics and ecosystem ecology, with an emphasis on bridging theory and application. We use tools from bioenergetic (e.g., growth, secondary production) and stoichiometric (i.e., content and recycling of essential elements [C:N:P]) frameworks to link species to whole-ecosystem material fluxes, and to examine effects of altered carbon and nutrient regimes on freshwater ecosystem structure and function.

Dreitz, Victoria

Research Associate Professor
Ecosystem and Conservation Sciences
The University of Montana - Missoula

To be completed by applicant

Dunkel, Florence

tenured Associate Professor of Entomology
Department of Plant Sciences and Plant Pathology
Montana State University - Bozeman

My research focuses on a systems approach to aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, particularly making use of natural products developed by plants for insect management, for example, exploration of use of plant-based products with entomopathogenic fungi for management of insects in Montana irrigated crops and of malaria in West African (Malian) villages. Underlying all of my research is the use of the holistic process and the valuing of traditional ecological knowledge , particularly in addressing issues of rural poverty.

Eby, Lisa

Associate Professor
Ecosystem and Conservation Sciences
The University of Montana - Missoula

Each year, I teach Fish Biology, Advanced Fisheries, Research Design, and Special Topics in Aquatic Ecology. I work to collaborate with management and conservation agencies to identify key questions and unknowns in our scientific understanding that is critical for management decisions. My research involves a range of projects.

Fredric Pollnac

AY2011-12
Department: 
Land Resources and Environmental Sciences
College/University: 
Montana State University

Gresswell, Robert

Research Biologist
Ecology
US Geological Survey, Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center

I have been studying habitat relationships and life-history organization of cutthroat trout for more than 35 years. I am currently a research biologist with the USGS Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center in Bozeman, Montana, and I am an affiliate assistant professor in the Department of Ecology at Montana State University. My interest in the role of disturbance in shaping the aquatic systems has led to research on the interactions among landscape-scale environmental features, instream habitat characteristics, and cutthroat trout abundance and distribution.

Gunnar Carnwath

AY2012-13
Department: 
Ecosystem and Conservation Sciences
College/University: 
University of Montana

Guy, Christopher

Associate Professor / Assistant Unit Leader
Department of Ecology-MT Cooperative Fishery Research Unit
Montana State University - Bozeman

I am the Assistant Unit Leader of the U.S. Geological Survey-Montana Cooperative Fishery Research Unit (MTCFRU) at Montana State University. The Unit is housed in the Department of Ecology-Fish and Wildlife Management Program.

Hansen, Andrew

Professor
Ecology
Montana State University - Bozeman

Andrew Hansen is Professor in the Ecology Department and Director of the Landscape Biodiversity Lab at Montana State University. He teaches macroecology to undergraduates and landscape ecology to graduate students. His research focuses on interactions among biodiversity, climate change, and land use, with an emphasis on landscape management and protected areas. He received a Ph.D. in ecology at the University of Tennessee and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Dr.

Hauer, Richard

Professor of Limnology and UM IoE Director
Division of Biological Sciences, Systems Ecology
The University of Montana - Missoula

Hauer joined UM and Flathead Lake Biological Station in 1986. Since 2001, he has held the chaired position of Professor of Limnology at Flathead Lake Biological Station. He divides his time between research and teaching. His recent research includes using remote sensing technologies from the BioStation’s research aircraft, which he pilots. Since 2009, he has guided the development of the new graduate program, Systems Ecology, and serves as the Program Director of this intercollegiate PhD program that serves the graduate students across the UM campus in large scale Systems Ecology.

Hebblewhite, Mark

Assistant Professor
Wildlife Biology
The University of Montana - Missoula

To be completed by applicant

IoE partners to create database of STEM resources

ScienceMontana STEM database

The Montana Institute on Ecosystems has partnered with Montana State University's Extended University to create ScienceMontana, an online database of educational resources covering science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) topics. The database features resources created in Montana and about Montana.

Ireland, Kathryn

Postdoctoral Researcher
Ecology
Montana State University - Bozeman

My primary research interest is understanding both the historical links and potential future interactions between climatic conditions, forest fires, and forest communities. I am particularly interested in applying simulation models to explore the potential impacts of climatic change on vegetation structure and composition and the resulting impacts on ecosystem function.

Kershner, Jeff

Center Director
Ecology
USGS Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center

For most of my career, I’ve worked on a variety of issues that are related to the effects of land management practices on aquatic and riparian resources. My past research includes work on native salmonids in Idaho, Utah and Wyoming, explores various aspects of aquatic and riparian resource monitoring, and looks at fire effects on streams and riparian areas.

Kiza Gates

AY2011-12
Department: 
Ecology
College/University: 
Montana State University

Krausman, Paul

Boone and Crockett Professor of Wildlife Conservation
Wildlife Biology
Boone and Crockett Club

Over my career I taught a variety of courses from anatomy and physiology to advanced wildlife courses. Those I enjoy most are the classes that help students think and develop professionally. I am using my editorial experience with numerous regional, national, and international journals to teach a graduate class in scientific writing for publication (in even years). In odd years I teach a graduate colloquium related to big game ecology.

Larson, Andrew

Assistant Professor
Forest Management
The University of Montana - Missoula

To be completed later.

Litt, Andrea

Assistant Professor
Ecology
Montana State University - Bozeman

My primary research interests include understanding the effects of abiotic and biotic factors on wildlife communities and populations, studying a diversity of animal taxonomic groups that will best help to answer the questions of interest, and collecting information that can be used to develop practical solutions to ecological problems and guide policy and management.

Lowe, Winsor

Associate Professor
Division of Biological Sciences
The University of Montana - Missoula

I'm interested in how spatial processes influence evolution, population biology, and community ecology. I am especially excited about using direct data on animal movement to explore the causes and consequences of dispersal. I hope this work will expand basic understanding of the ecology and evolution of dispersal, and improve landscape-scale management and conservation efforts.

Lowell, Jennifer

Assistant Professor
Health Sciences
Carroll College

I received my B.S. in Microbiology from the University of Arizona, and my M.S. and Ph.D. from Colorado State University in Microbial Ecology and Biology with an emphasis in Infectious Disease Ecology respectively. Currently I am an Assistant Professor of Health Sciences at Carroll College, Helena, MT. Prior to teaching at Carroll, l worked for six years at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as a molecular epidemiologist studying the plague in Colorado and Kazakhstan.

Lucotch, John

GIS Developer
Division of Biological Sciences
The University of Montana - Missoula

I am currently a GIS Developer for the Flathead Lake Biological Station, Numerical Terradynamic Simulation Group and Computational Ecology Lab . Prior to working for The University of Montana, I worked at the Montana Department of Natural Resources Forest Management Bureau as a GIS Intern. Finally, I was also accepted to the prestigious STEP program through the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency.

Lukacs, Paul

Assistant Professor
Department of Ecosystem Sciences/Wildlife Biology Program
University of Montana - Missoula

My research interests center on the development and application of quantitative methods to ecological problems, primarily in wildlife population dynamics. I strive to connect ecological theory to wildlife management problems and in doing so improve wildlife management and test ecological theory. I employ a combination of empirical field studies, statistical model development and software development to answer ecological questions and provide tools for conservation practitioners.

McGlynn, Brian

Professor of Watershed Hydrology and Biogeosciences
Earth & Ocean Sciences
Duke Nicholas School of the Environment

Study of watershed hydrology (streamwater sources, flowpaths, and age), land-atmosphere CO2, H2O, and energy fluxes, watershed biogeochemistry, and hydrological / biogeochemical / ecological implications of landuse change. We employ methods that include source water tracing, physical hydrology, eddy-covariance, and landscape analysis techniques. Our field-based research is focused on the spatial and temporal scaling of hydrological, biogeochemical, and ecological processes across watersheds and stream networks.

McMahon, Thomas

Professor of Fisheries
Ecology/Fish & Wildlife Ecology & Management Program
Montana State University - Bozeman

Research interests are fish ecology and management. I teach the following courses at MSU: WILD 201 Introduction to Fish and Wildlife, WILD 301 Principles of Fish and Wildlife Management (with Bob Garrott), BIOO 415 Ichthyology, WILD 513 Fisheries Habitat Management, and MSSE Ecology of Trout Streams (with Billie Kerans).

Menalled, Fabian

Associate Professor
Land Resources and Environmental Sciences
Montana State University - Bozeman

Our research focuses on understanding the ecological basis of sustainable agriculture and the integrated management of weeds. This program embraces a multi-disciplinary approach to address both basic and applied problems facing the agricultural communities of Montana. The overall goal of our off-campus teaching program is to develop and deliver a research-based educational program addressing local, regional, and national concerns associated with the economic, environmental, and social sustainability of integrated weed management strategies in agronomic crops.

Miller, Scott

Associate Professor
Division of Biological Sciences
The University of Montana - Missoula

Research: We take an integrative approach to address central questions in evolution and ecology regarding the origins, maintenance and distribution of biodiversity, and its impacts on ecosystem structure and function, with a particular emphasis on temperature adaptation of cyanobacteria along environmental gradients.

Montagne, Cliff

Professor of Soils
Land Resources and Environmental Sciences
Montana State University - Bozeman

Professional interests in soil science(pedology or landscape emphasis), geomorphology, plant and animal ecology, land use, traditional ecological knowledge, native science, teaching and learning pedogogies, and holistic decision making. Certified Educator for Holistic Management International.

Education includes BS in Geology, Dartmouth College, MS in Earth Sciences and PhD in Soils at Montana State University.

Muhlfeld, Clint

Research Aquatic Ecologist and Research Associate Professor
Systems Ecology
USGS Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center and The University of Montana Flathead Lake Biological Station

I am a Research Aquatic Ecologist for the USGS Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center in Glacier National Park and Research Associate Professor at The University of Montana's Flathead Lake Biological Station. My general research interests encompass the fields of aquatic ecology, fisheries biology, and conservation biology.

Nelson, Cara

Assistant Professor
Ecosystem and Conservation Sciences, College of Forestry
The University of Montana - Missoula

My research focuses on three primary areas: 1) effects of large-scale disturbance on understory plants and trees, 2) conceptual basis for restoration ecology, and 3) efficacy and ecological impacts of restoration practices. In addition to my research contributions, I serve as the Director of the College of Forestry and Conservation’s Wildlands Restoration Program and teach its five-course sequence on the science and practice of restoration.

Nicholas DeCesare

AY2012-13
Department: 
Ecosystem and Conservation Sciences
College/University: 
University of Montana

Patrick Lawrence

AY2012-13
Department: 
Land Resources and Environmental Sciences
College/University: 
Montana State University

Payn, Robert

Assistant Professor
Dept. of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences
Montana State University - Bozeman

My research focus is hydroecology, which is the study of the interaction of life with water in its environment. More specifically, I study the interactions of hydrological, chemical, and biological processes that determine the biogeochemical patterns observed in streams, rivers, and wetlands. Currently, my preferred approach is to use mechanistic simulation models to explore hypotheses, and then compare simulation results with field data to test and refine the hypotheses inherent in the model.

Pearson, Dean

Research Ecologist
Division of Biological Sciences
Rocky Mountain Research Station, USDA FS

My primary research interest is to advance community ecology through studies of biological invasions and to use this information to improve invasive species management. Biological invasions serve as grand natural experiments that provide unique opportunities to view the processes that structure ecological communities. Even in the most recently assembled natural communities organisms have had hundreds or thousands of years to interact and sort themselves into the modern assemblages we see.

Pederson, Gregory

Research Ecologist
Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center
U.S. Geological Survey

My research is focused primarily on climate variability and its role in driving biological and physical components of mountainous ecosystems of western North America. In addressing these issues I use instrumental and tree-ring based records of climate to assess the time intervals and spatial scales over which these processes operate. Of particular interest is the influence of interdecadal climate regimes, long-term temperature trends, and ocean-atmosphere teleconnections in driving observed changes in mountain snowpack, streamflow, glaciers, and forest disturbance events.

Perkins, Alison

Adjunct Faculty
School of Journalism Radio-Television Production
The University of Montana - Missoula

Dr. Perkins' interests lie at the intersection of media and science education. She holds a MS in Wildlife Biology, a MA in Radio-Television Production, and a PhD in Forestry and Conservation from The University of Montana. Her research interests include ecology education, how people learn about science, and sources of ecological knowledge (especially media). Perkins also is an independent producer with The Broadcast Media Center, where she is actively pursuing productions that enhance understanding of ecology and the environment.

Rachel Malison

AY2011-12
Department: 
Division of Biological Sciences
College/University: 
University of Montana

Rice, Peter

Research Ecologist
Division of Biological Sciences
The University of Montana - Missoula

My work focuses on planning and coordination of multi disciplinary studies in applied ecology and resource management with emphasis on invasive plant control, invasive aquatic plants, and native plant community restoration. I often examine the impacts of exotic species on biological diversity. Integrated weed management methods (herbicides, burning, biocontrols, revegetation) alter the competitive interactions between the target weeds and non-target natives. Related work includes exotic plant biogeography and GIS applications in weed management.

Roberts, Dave

Professor
Ecology
Montana State University - Bozeman

Professor of vegetation ecology and ecological community analysis

Samantha Caldwell

AY2012-13
Department: 
Division of Biological Sciences
College/University: 
University of Montana

Shane Vatland

AY2011-12
Department: 
Ecology
College/University: 
Montana State University

Shepard, Brad

Senior Aquatic Scientist
North American Aquatic Program
Wildlife Conservation Society

Leads research efforts collecting broad-scale and long-term information on effects of habitat fragmentation, climate change, non-native fish, and oil and gas development on native aquatic species in the Yellowstone Rockies area. Received Bachelor of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in Fish and Wildlife from Montana State University and a Master’s of Science degree in Fish Resources from the University of Idaho.

Six, Diana

Professor
Ecosystem and Conservation Sciences
The University of Montana - Missoula

Diana Six, PhD, is professor of forest entomology and pathology in the Department of Ecosystem and Conservation Sciences at the University of Montana, Missoula, where her research focuses on just about every aspect of bark beetles possible from evolution, to symbiosis with microbes, to ecology, to management. In recent years, it has expanded to include how global change is affecting these ecologically and economically important insects and the forests within which they live.

Sojda, Richard

Wildlife Biologist and Professor at MSU
Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center
Montana State University

Rick addresses applied research problems by combining interests in wildlife ecology, artificial intelligence, and decision support. He is a Fellow of the International Environmental Modelling and Software Society. Currently, he serves in three capacities: [1] as Branch Chief for Climate and Land Use Change and Decision Support at the Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center, [2] as co-Science Coordinator for the Great Northern Landscape Conservation Cooperative, and [3] as Science Advisor for Decision Support for the USGS in Climate and Land Use Change.

Stanford, Jack

Professor and Director
Division of Biological Sciences
Flathead Lake Biological Station

Jack A. Stanford is the Jessie M. Bierman Professor of Ecology and Director of the Flathead Lake Biological Station at The University of Montana, where he has worked since 1971. The Biological Station is a multi-disciplinary research and education center with 8 resident faculty and 20 staff members, including graduate students and post-doctoral scholars. Professor Stanford is well known internationally for his research on natural and cultural interactions in large river ecosystems. He has published 200 juried papers and books in limnology and ecology since receiving his Ph.D.

Tim Covino

AY2011-12
Department: 
Land Resources and Environmental Sciences
College/University: 
Montana State University

Vance, Linda

Senior Ecologist/Spatial Analysis Lab Director
Montana Natural Heritage Program
The University of Montana - Missoula

Ph.D, Conservation Ecology, University of California, Davis, 2004; LLM, York University, Downsview, Ontario Canada ,1980; BCL/JD, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec Canada, 1977. 2005-present: Montana Natural Heritage Program (University of Montana). Current position: Senior Ecologist and Spatial Analysis Lab Director, leading strategic planning and implementation of the ecological sciences component of the Montana Natural Heritage Program.

Ward, David

Professor
Department of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences
Montana State University - Bozeman

I am a microbial ecologist interested in understanding the composition, structure and function of microbial communities. My research has been focused mainly on relatively simple hot spring microbial mat communities, which are excellent and very tractable model systems from which to glean fundamentals of microbial community ecology.

Whitlock, Cathy

Professor or Earth Sciences and MSU IoE Director
Earth Sciences
Montana State University - Bozeman

Cathy Whitlock is the MSU Director of the Montana Institute on Ecosystems and Professor of Earth Sciences.  She is nationally and internationally recognized for her scholarly contributions and leadership activities in the field of past climatic and environmental change, and she has published over 140 reviewed journal articles and book chapters on this topic.  Her current research sites extend from Yellowstone and the western U.S.

William Kleindl

AY2011-12
Department: 
Division of Biological Sciences
College/University: 
University of Montana

Woods, Art

Associate Professor
Division of Biological Sciences
University of Montana

I am a physiological ecologist working at the University of Montana. My primary interests are in plant-insect ecology, and the physiological and biophysical details of their interaction. Currently, my lab group and I work at a field site in southeastern Arizona, near the Chiricahua Mountains, on a desert population of hawkmoths and several of their native host plants. More broadly, I'm interested in the physiology of invertebrates, applications of information theory to physiological ecology, and modeling species distributions.

Zabinski, Catherine

Associate Professor
Land Resources & Environmental Sciences
Montana State University - Bozeman

My work in belowground ecology takes place in the context of restoration, comparing disturbed, undisturbed and restored sites; in the context of natural extreme sites, particularly the thermal sites in Yellowstone National Park; and increasingly on questions related to sustainable agriculture. I am interested in mycorrhizal ecology, root system dynamics, plant-microbe interactions, and soil processes including decomposition and nutrient cycling.

Zale, Alexander

Professor and Unit Leader
Montana Cooperative Fishery Research Unit and Ecology
Montana State University - Bozeman

I lead, coordinate, and administer an applied fisheries research program addressing topics and issues of concern to the State of Montana and the U.S. Department of the Interior. Technical areas of special emphasis include restoration of native fishes, whirling disease, thermal ecology, population dynamics and effects of exotic fishes, and effects of environmental degradation on recreational salmonid fisheries. I advise graduate students and teach a graduate level course entitled Human Dimensions of Fish and wildlife Management.

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