MT-EPSCoR Focus 3

Building capacity to understand and manage vulnerability of ecosystem services to climate and land use change

The goal of this work is to develop and implement tools to conduct vulnerability assessments of ecological response to climate and land use change at spatial scales relevant to human adaptation to these changes.

Historical Observations by Blackfeet Elders and Ranchers of Climate Change & Its Effects

This project seeks to further information gathering, to record the stories, experiences, and observations of Blackfeet Elders and area ranchers related to climate change and its impact on the local ecology as well as the impact on local ranching practices.

Understanding Human and Landscape Responses to Regional Climate and Environmental Changes in Central Montana

The objectives of this project are to 1) support the paleo-ecological component of archeological investigations, 2) conduct reconnaissance study of kettle lakes and assess suitability for providing Holocene pollen and charcoal records, and 3) conduct a reconnaissance study of alluvial fan  and floodplain stratigraphy on both sides of the Big Belts.

Vegetation Dynamics in Response to Climate Change

This reseearch area investigates mainly how vegetation dynamics have responded to global change at regional to global scales using dynamic global vegetation models.

Yellowstone BAC and the Sciences of Vulnerability

This study looks at the water management structures of the Yellowstone River to better understand 1) the political ecology of water as a finite resource, with consideration of how ecological functions are promoted and valued; 2) human responses to the threat of resource depletions, especially in terms of willingness to adopt and advocate pre-crisis strategies that recognize human and non-human interests and functions; and 3) equity and justice  in resource sharing, both with human and non-human communities and functions.

Yellowstone BAC and the Sciences of Vulnerability

This study looks at the water management structures of the Yellowstone River to better understand 1) the political ecology of water as a finite resource, with consideration of how ecological functions are promoted and valued; 2) human responses to the threat of resource depletions, especially in terms of willingness to adopt and advocate pre-crisis strategies that recognize human and non-human interests and functions; and 3) equity and justice  in resource sharing, both with human and non-human communities and functions.

Partners

MSU IoE Office

Montana State University
605 Leon Johnson Hall
Bozeman, MT 59717
(406) 994-2374
MSU Director: Cathy Whitlock

UM IoE Office

The Universityi of Montana

The University of Montana
Davidson Honors College
Missoula, MT 59812
(406) 243-6058
UM Director: Maury Valett

 

Montana University System

Montana University System

Office of the Commissioner of Higher Education
2500 Broadway Street
Helena, MT 59620
406-444-6570